Pupil Premium

PUPIL PREMIUM IMPACT REPORT

Pupil Premium is funding that we receive from the Government. It is additional to our main school funding and is used to address the underlying inequalities between children who are eligible for free school meals (FSM) or Children in Care (CiC) and their wealthier peers by making sure that this extra funding reaches the children who need it most.

It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per FSM pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.                                                                   Source DfE website

 

Q.        What is the school’s allocation of Pupil Premium?

 

 

2011 / 2012

2012 / 2013

2013 / 2014

2014 / 2015

2015 / 2016

2016 / 2017

% pupils receiving Free School Meals (FSM) or who have received FSM within the last 6 years (FSM 6)

 

20%

17%

28.2%

25%

 

% Children in Care (CiC)

 

2%

2%

2%

2%

 

 Pupil Premium Funding

£21, 960

£35,826

£59, 400

£87, 280

£88, 569

 

Amount per child

£430

£619

£900

£1320

£1320

 

Attendance

 

 

 

 

% PP pupils with attendance above 95% - minimum expectation

 

63%

 

65%

 

 

% PP pupils with exclusions

n/a – no exclusions

n/a – no exclusions

0

1 pupil

0

 

NB – PP Funding was increased in 2012 to include children who have had Free School Meals at any time within the last 6 years.

Principles

At Whitstable Junior School:

  • we ensure that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all of the pupils.
  • we ensure that appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of socially disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged pupils, we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.
  • Pupil premium funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority classes, groups or individuals. Limited funding and resources means that not all children receiving free school meals will be in receipt of pupil premium interventions at one time.

At Whitstable Junior School we have taken account of the Sutton Trust commissioned academic study which explored the impact of a whole range of ways to target pupil premium funding. We chose three strategies known to have impact on learning:

·         Feedback and implementation of designated response time for pupils to marking which has high impact on learning (8+ months extra progress for all children)

·         Small group tuition which has considerable impact on targeted children  (4+ months extra progress)

·         Well-being support – social, emotional aspects of learning  (4+ months extra progress)

In addition – and at no additional cost – we also used peer tutoring extensively in 2012 / 2013 within Year 6 maths – 6+ months extra progress. This proved very effective and popular and has subsequently been used across the school, utilising Year 6 peer tutors.

Q.   How do we know if this is making a difference?

We track the progress of all of our pupils in school on a termly basis and we compare children according to different characteristics including FSM and CiC. The DFE also publish our results in a report called RAISEonline which analyses our school data. Below is a summary of the progress of Pupil Premium children. These figures demonstrate that children who are FSM or CiC make good progress at Whitstable Junior School.

Measuring the impact of  Pupil Premium Grant  2014/2015

This shows progress based on teacher assessment for Years 3 -5 and the progress of Year 6 children based on Year 6 SATs results - July 2015. It shows the progress made by all pupil premium pupils compared with non-pupil premium pupils.

Year 6 – end of KS SATs 2015 (old curriculum, old assessment system)

Q.  How did the expected and above expected progress of Pupil Premium compare with those not eligible in Reading, Writing and Maths  - reported as 2 or 3 levels of progress.

 

Subject

Pupil Premium children making at least 2 full levels of progress

Pupil premium children making 3 full levels of progress

Maths

94%

19%

Reading

88%

50%

Writing

100%

62%

Q: How did the in-year progress of children eligible for Pupil Premium compare with those who were not eligible in Reading, Writing and Mathematics? (Reported as Average Points Progress)

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

 

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Year 6

3.5

2.8

5.4

6.3

2.5

3.9

In reading children in receipt of Pupil Premium progressed more than those who were not eligible. In Writing they made above expected progress but less than those not eligible. In Maths, Children in receipt of Pupil Premium fell behind those not eligible.

Q: How did Key Stage progress of children eligible for Pupil Premium compare with those who were not eligible in Reading, Writing and Mathematics?

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

 

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Eligible for PP

Not eligible for PP

Year 6

14.8

14.0

15.3

15.3

12.9

14.3

In Reading, children in receipt of Pupil Premium progressed more than those who were not eligible. In Writing the progress was the same between the two groups. In Maths, Children in receipt of Pupil Premium fell behind those not eligible.

 

Q: Given the fact that pupil premium funding can be targeted towards any children who are working below the expected level (defined in this case as achieving below a Level 2b at Key Stage 1) what was the in-year progress profile of this group?

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

 

<2b

2b

2a/3

<2b

2b

2a/3

<2b

2b

2a/3

Year 6

6.7

2.5

1.6

6.5

5.9

5.3

5.3

2.9

3.2

In all subjects, the children who were within this profile made more progress than their peers.

Q: Given the fact that pupil premium funding can be targeted towards any children who are working below the expected level (defined in this case as achieving below a Level 2b at Key Stage 1) what was the Key Stage progress profile of this group?

 

Reading

Writing

Mathematics

 

<2b

2b

2a/3

<2b

2b

2a/3

<2b

2b

2a/3

Year 6

15.1

14.3

13.4

16.6

15.0

14.8

13.6

13.3

15.2

Across the key stage, and in all Reading and Writing, this group of children made more progress than their peers and in Maths this group made comparable but slightly greater progress than the 2b group but less than the 2a/3 group.

Q: In the current academic year (2015/16) what is the school planning to spend its Pupil Premium money on?

Allocation of Pupil Premium Grant 2015/2016

Action

Allocation

·         Pay the salary of an additional LSA to offer 1:1 or small group tuition for targeted Pupil Premium pupils

·         Pay the additional costs of  1:1 tutors who are qualified teachers for a small number of Pupil Premium pupils

·         Fund the costs of a play therapist to support individual children

·         Partially fund the costs of a Family Liaison Officer to work with children and families – including an extension of this role to include Early Help manager thereby increasing the support available externally to vulnerable families

·         Partially fund the costs of two well-being mentors to support the social, emotional and behavioural needs of targeted children, including the provision of a structured play / supervised lunch time Games Zone on the playground

·         Partially fund the salaries of a team of eight LSA’s to ensure focused interventions and support for PP pupils as identified in termly (6 X per year) pupil progress meetings

·         Contribute towards the costs of enrichment activities for some vulnerable families e.g. fund individual costs of class trips and residential school journey. Contribute towards costs of free/partially funded breakfast and after school clubs for specific vulnerable children

·         Partial funding of  Read, Write Inc resources and additional staffing costs

·         Contingency funds for prize incentives to improve attendance, costs towards uniform for disadvantaged pupils when appropriate.

£5.5K

£2.5K

£6.5K

£13K

 

£14 569

 

£28K

 

£6K

 

 

£8K

£4.5K

TOTAL

£88 569

The date of the next review of the school's Pupil Premium Strategy is: Friday 5th June 2017